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Dissenters Welcome

 

 

Black Sheep Baptist?

A fair warning.

I’m still understanding what a black sheep Baptist is myself, so this explanation will probably change from time to time.

*This is MY definition and understanding of being an outsider in the faith community I'm in while also representing that same faith to those outside of the "Baptist fold." I'm aware that my definition is not in any way exhaustive. The term black sheep has been used over the centuries to be both a label of praise and one of disenfranchisement and I want to be respectful to those who have a different definition of this term. While I hope to offer a positive perception of what a black sheep is in my specific context, I sympathize with those for whom this word is beyond redemption. 

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Since referring to myself as a black sheep Baptist I’ve had to try and unpack what’s behind that label. For me, a black sheep is someone who’s on the fringe of a particularly group. In my case, I’m talking about the good ole’ Baptist faith. Now let me be clear, I’m not a renegade type person in anyway. I work in the institutional church, which for all it’s faults, is a beautiful and wonderful thing. My presence there is to be "detached voice, offering criticism that is provocative yet rarely heeded."* However Will D. Campbell, you’ll hear me mention Campbell A LOT if you stay connected with me, says you can work within an institution or a system but always be aware that you’re in it. What Brother Will I believe alludes to is the notion of the institution becoming a voice and motivating force instead of the individuals and communities that reside under those steeples (you see, Baptist are pretty big on the individual divine experience). So in a not so short answer, I work for the institutional church, but operate through an individual freedom of calling that my faith demands. Sometime that puts me on the fringe of things. Not a bad place to be since it allows me to move and shift from one fringe to another. I often tell people, in my default setting I’m uneasy around church folks. I say that not to imply I’m a sketchy person or I’m trying to hide something, but to say I didn’t grow up around Sunday morning church attenders (my great aunt Emmie being the exception). I feel more at home with those who spent their lives nursing hangovers on Sunday mornings, always being in the wrong place at the wrong time, and speaking more like sailors than deacons. This is where being a black sheep helps me because I get to be in both of these communities. I get to walk in the church with saints whose life stories are those of sanctification, and I get to spend time with those saints whose lives are still “under-construction.” I’m privilege to be able to have a foot in both worlds.And sometimes, as much as we black sheep try to fight it, the rest of the flock invite us in. They bring us into the fold and remind us that although we might appear different we are still moving in the same direction. We are grazing in the same spaces. We are all sheep being looked after by the same Shepard.

*Will Campbell: Radical Prophet of the South, Merrill M. Hawkins, Jr. 

Justin Who?

The question of ‘Who are you’ always feels so daunting. A few shorts words would never be able to describe who I am or what my purpose on this world might possible be. However, an introduction I suppose is in order.

I have spent my entire life in the South of these United States, particularly in North Carolina where I was born and bred. The land and region have played a huge part in my development in ways I am now just discovering. The Old North State was the source of my nature, while my family dealt with the nurturing aspects of my upbringing.  Flannery O'Connors description of a "Christ-Haunted South" couldn't be more spot on. 

I wouldn’t say I stumbled into faith, more like it crashed into me. Through a series of events to long to share here, I, in my mid-twenties began to visit many different kinds of churches. And somehow (providence?) I ended up in the Baptist faith where I was ordained. I currently serve at a Cooperative Baptist Church in Statesville, NC. 

I'm married to a wonderful wife, Lauren. I have an adorable daughter, Violet. I'm constantly vaccuming up the hair of two cats and Fred our Golden Retriever. We live in Winston-Salem, NC where I attended divinity school at Wake Forest University.

 

In the 10th chapter of John's Gospel, Jesus makes it clear that he had "other sheep that do not belong to this fold..." Below, are fellow dissenters and "black sheep" who have been kind enough to submit their voices to the masses.

  Kenley Stewart   Kenly is a first year student at Wake Forest School of Divinity pursing his Masters in Divinity. He completed his undergraduate degree at Campbell University and graduated in 2017 with a B.A. in History with a Minor in Religion. After completing his current degree at Wake Div, he hopes to further his education and pursue doctoral studies. His academic interests include American history, politics/foreign policy, and religion. His hobbies include visiting historic sites, watching movies, and reading/collecting way too many books.    READ KENLY HERE  .

Kenley Stewart

Kenly is a first year student at Wake Forest School of Divinity pursing his Masters in Divinity. He completed his undergraduate degree at Campbell University and graduated in 2017 with a B.A. in History with a Minor in Religion. After completing his current degree at Wake Div, he hopes to further his education and pursue doctoral studies. His academic interests include American history, politics/foreign policy, and religion. His hobbies include visiting historic sites, watching movies, and reading/collecting way too many books. 

READ KENLY HERE.

  Shakeisha Holton Gray   Shakeisha is a graduate of Wake Forest University School of Divinity and is a candidate minister with the Unitarian Universalist Association. She is an advocate for autoimmune disease awareness, food insecurity, and access to the arts. She and her husband Jason have three sons and dream of owning their own farm soon. Shakeisha has been accepted into Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and FaithHealth's chaplaincy residency program for the 2018-2019 academic year.  When not in school or at work, she naps and writes at  SimplyShakeisha.com    READ SHAKEISHA HERE.

Shakeisha Holton Gray

Shakeisha is a graduate of Wake Forest University School of Divinity and is a candidate minister with the Unitarian Universalist Association. She is an advocate for autoimmune disease awareness, food insecurity, and access to the arts. She and her husband Jason have three sons and dream of owning their own farm soon. Shakeisha has been accepted into Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and FaithHealth's chaplaincy residency program for the 2018-2019 academic year.  When not in school or at work, she naps and writes at SimplyShakeisha.com

READ SHAKEISHA HERE.

 Rev. Emily Davis  Emily is a graduate of Wake Forest University School of Divinity and is ordained in the Baptist church. She enjoys spending time with her wonderful family and friends, and plans to pursue congregational youth ministry.    READ EMILY HERE.  

Rev. Emily Davis

Emily is a graduate of Wake Forest University School of Divinity and is ordained in the Baptist church. She enjoys spending time with her wonderful family and friends, and plans to pursue congregational youth ministry. 

READ EMILY HERE. 

 

Let's Talk

I like to sit across from people. If you're around Winston-Salem, or the Triad area , and want to grab coffee, a meal, or some libations...shoot me an email or reach out on social media (links at bottom of page). 
Cheers

~tBSB

 

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